10 Things I Learned in September 2016

mums and pumpkins

Another month and another ten lessons. I continue to be amazed at how near the end of each month I consistently feel that I will not have enough items to write about, yet by the time I’m done, I usually end up with a sufficient list. If I’m on top of things, I keep a running list of what I’m learning (the best way to remember all those little things we learn without thinking). But even if I create my list in somewhat of a last-minute fashion, it never ceases to amaze me how much new knowledge I’ve acquired each month!. It really is true that we should never stop learning!

 

10 Things I Learned in September 2016:

 

1. We are actually more productive when we take breaks.afternoon nap on couch

I’ve probably known this to some extent for a long time, but I never realized that it has been backed up scientifically. I will say that the longer I live, the more I know this to be true in my own life. While reading online this month , I came across a link to this informative article, which explains scientific reasons to prioritize breaks as well as other helpful tips on recharging to be more productive.

2. Chlorine is really bad for jewelry (the second worse element?).

I recently heard this while dropping off some jewelry for repairs at our local jewelers. You can read more details in this article (by a different jeweler online). Chlorine or bleach cause a chemical reaction that breaks down the alloys in jewelry. So before you stick your precious hands in a bleach cleaner or jump into that pool, please remove your rings!

3. I really, really dislike throwing out food and deciding if food is still safe to eat is one of my most “un-favorite”decisions.

Recently I had some ground turkey thawing in the refrigerator; two pounds to be exact. As life sometimes goes, I got busy and didn’t cook it quite as soon as I had planned. One evening I warmed up my big frying pan, got out the turkey, and threw a pound in to cook. It was already late and I was tired, but I figured at least if I cooked the meat, it would be safe to wait another day until I could make the recipe I was planning.

But when I opened the second pound to add to my hot pan, it didn’t smell right to me. Knowing that it had been out maybe a day or so longer than recommended, I immediately became worried that it may have been starting to go bad. I was so upset and confused! I hate wasting food; perhaps because we try to stick to a tight food budget, and also because of the way I was raised by my family. My grandparents lived through the days of the depression, and their generation especially learned not to waste anything.

I often work hard to scrimp and save and try to make do with what I have, so throwing a whole two pounds of meat did not make me a happy camper. Even if my money allowed, I would still have a problem with wasting food, as I aim to be a good steward of all God has blessed me with.

So this was really emotionally difficult for me, magnified, I’m sure, by the lateness of the hour and my tiredness. I finally just made the decision to throw out the whole two pounds, just in case it was unsafe to eat. I wrapped it all up in plastic shopping bags and immediately stomped it out to my trash. I was really upset.

I had to realize that the risk of food poisoning or sick stomachs is not worth a couple of pounds of ground turkey meat, yet I was surprised at how upsetting it was to me. It took me a surprisingly long time to get over the incident. This is just another example of something that needs to be in balance, and for which I need to allow myself some grace.

The time I burnt my chicken dogs to a crisp, however, it was obvious even to me that they were trash!

2016-05-22 Chicken dogs burnt to a crisp (literally).

My chicken dogs, literally burnt to a crisp!

4. When I go downstairs to get something, I almost always forget what it was.

Does this happen to you? (If you’re anywhere near middle age or older, I can bet that it has.) Since we’ve been middle aged, it seems that my husband and I, more often than not, completely forget the item(s) we’ve gone for as soon as we make it down the stairs to our basement.

Did you know that this is “a thing”? It really made me feel better when a few months ago an older friend at church told me that there was a logical explanation for forgetting things when we cross a threshold (or go downstairs, I guess). It’s referred to as the “doorway effect” or the “boundary effect“, and these articles provide a thorough explanation that will probably make you feel a little less crazy, as it did for me.

Now what was I saying?

5. I can do a two and a half minute plank (and probably many more things I thought were impossible).

At the beginning of September, someone in my online Pilates subscription group posted a challenge to do a plank every night in September before bed. On week one we were to start with one minute, and add thirty seconds each week, ending the month with a week of two-and-a-half minute planks! Well, I agreed and started doing one-minute planks. It was great, and by week two, I felt good, but also quickly realized that the two-and-a-half minute goal was going to be TOUGH! I kept going, though, and must have gotten physically stronger and more determined as I went along. By the last week, it wascat on exercise mat difficult, but I was able to manage a two-and-a-half minute plank for five total days!

So what’s my point? That I’m a super-athlete? Not even close!

My point is that often we can do much more than we think is possible! This is true both physically and emotionally/mentally/spiritually. Sometimes it will be hard; it may even feel (or appear) impossible, but more often than not it can be done. If we are determined, accept the help we need (from others & God), and do the hard work, we can do much more than we give ourselves credit for!

So go out and take a baby step and watch how much you grow.

6. Most commercially canned pumpkin is not made from the traditional carving-type pumpkins we are used to seeing, but is still real pumpkin.

According to this Snopes article, which gives a lot of interesting information about squash and pumpkins, most canned pumpkin is made from “a specific cultivar of pumpkin called Dickinson.” It is not as “pretty” as the pumpkins we associate with all things fall, but is still a variety of pumpkin and was specially cultivated for the purpose of canning pumpkin.

Furthermore, squash and pumpkins are not only in the same family, but can be used in most recipes interchangeably. In my summer/fall of working on a local farm this year, I’ve learned that certain people actually request Hubbard squash to make their “pumpkin” recipes.

What I really find interesting (and slightly disturbing) is how upsetting this has been to some folk. One person (quoted in the same Snopes article), who believed that canned pumpkin is really a mixture of squashes stated that it made him question everything in his life. Really?

I understand and agree with the fact that we, as intelligent, free consumers should know what we are actually purchasing, but if we’re losing sleep over which variety of squash or pumpkin resides in our store-bought can, I suggest we take up gardening, grow our own pumpkins and squash, and never have a worry again.

CSA farm share vegetables and fruit

7. Stored potatoes actually need a certain amount of humidity (and I thought they needed a dry climate)!

I just learned today that if your potatoes tend to begin to shrivel as mine often do when we keep them for awhile, it’s not because it’s too humid, but too dry! I guess I should have come to this conclusion myself, since shriveling is generally due to losing water, but somehow I missed that.

Our basement tends to be a little humid, especially in the summer months, so we generally run a dehumidifier. My friend who happens to be my boss this summer on the farm (also where we get our CSA farm share), told me that the dehumidifier is actually the problem when it comes to making my potatoes last! Hopefully this information will help us to store our potatoes better and not waste as much.

Here’s an article which includes some great potato-storing information, especially for winter-time. (Make sure you follow the link included for other innovative potato storing tips, even if you, like me, don’t have a root cellar or ideal storage area.)

8. The area which makes up the top part of our chest (right beneath our neck), is called the decolletage.

Well, that’s roughly how my friend described it. This came up in a conversation amongst a group of my woman friends the other night.

Accordingto Wikipedia, the decolletage is,

“the upper part of a woman’s torso, comprising her neck, shoulders, back and chest, that is exposed by the neckline of her clothing. However, the term is most commonly applied to a neckline that reveals or emphasizes cleavage.”

decollatage

Interesting. And this:

“Décolletage is a French word which is derived from décolleter, meaning to reveal the neck.”

Since it’s getting colder these past few first fall days, I think I’ll be keeping my decolletage under cover. I’m so relieved that I now know the correct name of the body part hidden beneath my infinity scarves.

9. We really do not care for turban squash after all.

As much as we generally like squash, and try to be open to trying and appreciating different types of foods, we as a family decided that we really don’t care for turban squash.  I’ve probably tried one each fall, as I like the variety and trying new foods, but I honestly don’t recall our previous experiences. All I can tell you is that I’m just not sure it’s worth the time and effort to try to find a way to prepare turban squash in a way that we enjoy.

It’s such a pretty, colorful squash, and there are many recipes that call for somewhat elaborately stuffing this interesting gourd. But since I’m still not convinced we will like it, I may just pass on that and call it a day. I learned growing up (and have continued to feel strongly about), not wasting food and learning to eat and appreciate as many healthy foods as possible, but I think in this case, I have to give myself permission to dislike or refrain from eating turban squash.

If you happen to have a favorite recipe for turban squash that you’re just dying to share, please let me know so I can give it one last-ditch effort…..or better yet, invite me over to your house and prepare it for me!

turban squash pile

10. “Among” and “amongst” mean the same thing and are both acceptable, but they may be viewed differently by others.

In writing this post, I had to add one more item (causing my “type A” personality to feel so much more comfortable with this nice, even number).

I’ve noticed that when I type the word, “amongst” on my computer, it underlines it as an incorrect word. So today I decided to look it up.

It seems that both words are valid and mean essentially the same, but according to this OxfordWords Blogs post, one may be more common depending on where you are speaking, and it’s even possible (at least in the US), that the word you chose may affect how you come across to your listeners. The post states that:

“in US English, amongst is now seen as old-fashioned, and even ‘pretentious’. If you are a US English speaker, therefore, and you don’t want to come across to your audience as out of date or, heaven forbid, linguistically la-di-da, then it’s advisable to opt for among.”

Well, that clears things up, and while I do not wish to appear haughty in any way, I just added the word, “amongst” to my computer dictionary. Now I will not have to be amongst those who are questioning whether it’s a word anymore.

*****

What have you learned this month? Do you have anything to share about vegetables, necklines, forgetting and/or taking breaks? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

 

 

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