close-up of grasshopper eating my mums

Discover

close-up of grasshopper eating my mums

I’m writing this post (actually on Friday, no less!), for the link-up at Five Minute Friday, and today’s prompt is discover.

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Discover.

The word evokes feelings of adventure, of something exciting or unknown; not generally something I find or experience every day.

And why not?

Have I become so busy doing the mundane tasks of life that I won’t allow myself the simple joy of discovery?

The answer, sadly, is mostly yes.

My personality tends towards thinking about what has to be done, what I should do in a given situation, the responsibilities that are so necessary, yet don’t often provoke wonder.

I so love that there are times to purposely observe something new or different or exciting (like on vacations, on a simple walk in the woods, or in the middle of an inspiring worship service), but I realize that most of life is not lived this way. We are simply trying to get by and sometimes just get through a day.

But what if our views were bigger?

What if even in the midst of busyness and responsibility and “to-do’s” we would choose to stop, take a moment to breathe, look up and see the wonders that are all around us?

What if I were to awake with the attitude that this is a new day, full of wonder and awe, even to be found in the middle of loads of laundry, piles of dishes, family discussions, organizing and cleaning, or going to my average job?

I pray that I will take the time, change my perspective, and look for the extraordinary in the ordinary.

Because all of life is to be lived to the full.

All of my days were planned before I was even born.

 

You saw me before I was born.
    Every day of my life was recorded in your book.
Every moment was laid out
    before a single day had passed.” – Psalm 139:16, NLT

 

Even on a hard day or in difficult circumstances, I have a choice to look up and trust that God is for me and my good life.

And that brings me gratitude, hope and joy.

 

“…singing a song of thanksgiving
    and telling of all your wonders.” – Psalm 26:7, NLT

*****

 

 

 

 

 

across the street from a farm

Why I Threw Out the Beef – A Post About Caring for Myself

across the street from a farm

 

 

I confess……I did it.

I threw out over 3 pounds of ground beef today.

After agonizing for at least a half hour, re-reading information about food safety (which I pretty much had already committed to memory) in hopes of finding one decent shred of information to convince me that it was safe, and realizing how ridiculous it was to feel so emotional about a simple kitchen decision…..I just threw over 3 pounds of ground beef in the trash.

It was one of those times where the busyness of life kept pushing me to put off cooking the beef until the next day, then another day, and then another one…..until finally today when I got my courage up to look at the “sell by” date. It was already past the standard information about cooking ground beef after only 1-2 days in the fridge.

In the end, I just couldn’t take the risk. It wasn’t as obvious as the time I burnt the hot-dogs to a crisp. Even though I still think if I had cooked it well enough we probably would have been fine, the risk of four of us throwing up with food poisoning was just too great a consequence to chance.

I’m being a bit transparent here, but when push comes to shove, and for whatever reason I find myself in that place of having once again to decide whether or not cooking and consuming some food or meat is safe for my family, I hate it. I find this to be one of the most difficult life decisions that comes around now and again.

It feels like some kind of a failure.

You see, I pride myself in not wasting, whether it be food, money or other stuff. It’s important to me to be a good steward of all I own or am given charge of, so yes, it really bothers me to throw out food. I have at least one grandparent who taught me to not waste a thing. Actually, I learned from all of my grandparents who went through times when money was tight.

These stories, along with how simply finding an orange in their Christmas stockings was a rare treat, how they made do with, re-used, and foraged, the ways that they toiled over gardens, canning and cooking, and cleaning really impacted me. When I hear of how they scrimped and saved so that not only was their family provided for, but we even benefited years later as children and grandchildren, it’s made me really dislike wasting food.

When I was a teacher’s aide, one teacher friend of mine used to compliment my skills in being able to save, make do with, or “fudge it” with whatever materials we had on hand, and it made me feel good.

One of the very purposes of writing this blog is to help others by sharing how I make do with what I have, thus saving time and/or money and minimizing waste. I like to use produce (like bananas), stale bread, and leftovers and make something good to eat out of them, as well as help us to preserve the food we buy, so throwing food out is always painful to me.

Now you may be thinking by now that I should get a life, that obviously I have things too good or that I should hang around some people going through something really difficult, and on one hand you’re right. I have gone through my share of life’s difficulties, although I’m thankful they haven’t been “worse” (on the imaginary scale we all have in our hearts and minds of situations that we deem “awful”).

But in reality, sometimes it’s the day to day “little” things that can be really hard for us.

In my fifty-one plus years of living, I have often felt more successful in making some really hard decisions or in my mature response to a really difficult situation than how I’ve sometimes handled the seemingly petty ones that surreptitiously plague me on a regular day.

It’s just that I spend time scrimping and saving in little ways (that I believe add up in the end), and so a “big” waste like this seems to devalue some of the time and energy I’ve spent on smaller things.

The final straw today was when I figured out how much time and emotional energy I was spending on what should have been a day off. I decided then and there that I was worth more than three pounds or so of meat.

One of the lessons I’ve never forgotten was lovingly presented by my sister when she was here with her family for a visit some years ago. I’m not sure if she even realizes that I still remember and think about what she said. I must have been stressing over rinsing out a salad dressing bottle for recycling; the one little thing that at that busy moment was emotionally pushing me over the edge, when she said something to me.

She told me that I was worth more than a dirty salad dressing bottle.

Sounds simple enough, but how often have we let guilt, pressure or what others think about us dictate our doing that one more thing that ultimately in the end was really less important than our health and well-being? I know I’m guilty of this. I naturally tend to be a people pleaser, and on top of that, I can be my own worst critic and put undue pressure on myself.

While I certainly believe in and normally practice recycling, reusing and generally not wasting, there are times where I need to make the simple choice to prioritize myself over an inanimate object.

It may sound stupid, but I see myself and many women striving or tormenting ourselves over things that may be important, but are much less important than us.

There are times when throwing something out or letting it go to waste is actually the right thing to do.

I may or may not have actually shed a few tears about my decision today, but if I did, it’s because I had come to the end of my emotional rope with just a few too many responsibilities weighing me down lately. Thankfully, life is actually going well right now, but there has just been a lot going on with many changes and the usual challenges. And I’ve been feeling overwhelmed and behind lately, especially since I lost several months of use of one hand when I cut my finger tendon.

So today was a day I needed to let myself off of the hook.

My dear husband came to my rescue by offering to take me out to dinner. We decided instead to stay at home and order some food to enjoy here, since I may have had puffy eyes and not enough energy to get myself looking decent enough for enjoying time in public. It’s rainy and very humid, so a bad hair day, too.

So I accepted his gracious offer and enjoyed sitting comfortably beside him thankfully enjoying our dinner made by someone else. We watched a couple of television shows and just chilled.

After dinner, I did a couple of things to get ready for another busy week. I took a frozen turkey out of my freezer (which needs desperately to be defrosted later this week), in hopes that I will be more successful in getting to cook that meat.

I now feel I may just have the strength to do this week better because I took some time to care for myself.

And I am worth it.

 

Here are some simple ways you can prioritize care for yourself:

  1. Stop and breathe or stretch.
  2. Take a walk or get some exercise.
  3. Enjoy a warm (or cold) drink.
  4. Let it go!
  5. Do something fun.
  6. Listen to music.
  7. Take a nap or go to bed early.
  8. Leave it to someone else.
  9. Do it later.
  10. Settle for  “good enough”.
  11. Spend some time with someone you love.
  12. Have some “alone” time.
  13. Take a warm bath or a cool shower.
  14. Simplify your responsibility.
  15. Ask for help.

 

Although these are just some quick ideas I came up with, I’ve written in more detail about ways we can care for ourselves when we’re feeling run-down or our emotions are frazzled. 

We all need to realize when enough is enough. Sometimes we may need more help or even the counsel or advice of a professional.

Most of the time we just need to cut ourselves some slack, and prioritize our own care.

Then we can have the renewed strength to be our best for God and others.

*****

 

 

 

 

looking up giant tree trunk

The Gift of Being Able to Depend

looking up giant tree trunk

 

This post contains my brief but deep thoughts today, and was produced to add to the link-up at Five Minute Friday, where the word for the week is depend.

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Another shooting on the news this morning.

And this trailing shortly behind natural disasters that have affected so many.

When will it ever end?

There is trouble in this world, to be sure. Every day brings more confirmation, whether it is broadcast from the news or I feel a discord deep inside my heart.

I almost didn’t write on this link-up. When I saw the word prompt, “depend”, I thought it was too similar to the last post I wrote for this link-up on the word, “support“.

But after listening to details of a new (and possibly the worst) shooting on the radio while driving today, my thoughts, emotions and determination turned back once again to my utter dependence on God.

I can’t do this life alone. I just can’t.

But neither could my relatives long ago who followed the prompting of the Holy Spirit and left the Ukraine for North America. If they didn’t listen, I probably wouldn’t be here today.  My grandmother from that same family depended on God her whole life, from the painful loss of my grandparents’ six-year old son (my mother’s young brother), through an early death of my grandfather to a heart attack (yet still managing to live a full and joyful life in the midst of hardships), to a difficult, yet victorious end at the ripe age of 93.

On my father’s side of the family, my grandfather became blind as a young man. Despite the fear and frustration of having to depend on his wife for support (in a time where this was contrary to society), he embraced his condition in time and was one of the most happy (even silly!) people I’ve known. My grandmother became the provider for the family for many years. They both depended on their faith in a God in whom they chose to trust.

My mother, grandmother, father-in-law and my sister’s first husband all fought cancer. There are those in the family who are fighting today, but not without dependence on their faith to see them through each day. There are many different outcomes to their unique struggles, but what they had in common was they all chose to depend on God and trust him to use their circumstances for their ultimate good.

I have seen and felt joy, peace, blessing and extreme happiness, and have lived through pain, hurt, fears and disappointment.

And through it all, I am not ashamed to say that I depend on a faithful God who loves me, even through the hard times.

I admit my absolute need to lean on those around me whom he provides for my support, help and pleasure.

I desire to be one on whom others can depend.

I’m so thankful that often dependence is a happy thing, but grateful also that it is there when I simply cannot.

My life will continue to depend on more than just myself.

And that’s OK.

It is a gift.

*****