10 Things I Learned In a Pandemic – Spring 2020

Spring 2020 potted herbs

Early this spring, we quickly found ourselves in the middle of a pandemic. As the Corona virus began to spread and affect us here in North America, the world began to shut down and ramp up, simultaneously.

It seems that most of us have found ourselves in one of two extreme categories: those who were told to go home and stay there to be safe (either paid or unpaid), or the many others who rose to the front-lines and still soldier on there today, helping to find a cure, save and/or protect lives, or simply provide us with food and other necessities we find essential.

I feel like I should call this, “10 Things I’m Learning…”, because although things are slowly getting better, we have a long way to go to get back to anything resembling normal. So we keep on learning.

While this list isn’t necessarily all pandemic related, it certainly reflects that. I’ve included some lighter notes as well, but the truth is none of us has ever found ourselves in such a place as this before.

So whether I’m able to express something that you have also found to be true, or I can provide you with a pleasant little distraction in hard times, please enjoy reading what I’ve learned this spring.

Thanks to Emily P. Freeman for teaching me how to reflect and for inviting us to join in her link-up to share our findings.


1. Functioning in a crisis is exhausting.

Early on in this pandemic, I began to formulate plans for all of the wonderful things that I could accomplish while being asked to stay at home. But I quickly realized that everything about a pandemic is exhausting: simple everyday tasks that now include more thought or work to keep things clean and healthy, going out in public and seeing folks wearing face-masks as a new addition to their regular wardrobe, hearing about another person who had to die without being close to the ones they love, or just getting used to a different schedule, rhythm, and routine that looks almost nothing like it did before.

Yeah, I accomplished a few good things. But truthfully, being productive was not my strong suit. There were days I had to stop and have a good cry and just give myself lots of grace.

2. I am much happier being less busy and spending more time at home.

I’ve always known this, and although I have had jobs I enjoy and I like getting out of the house, I much prefer to have more time at home. Even though I’ve sorely missed going to church and physically getting together with people, I have adjusted quite well to being home full time. I definitely enjoy a slower pace, less commitments, and can function better with less on my plate.

3. Bananas can be OK to eat even when really dark.

I like to keep bananas on hand for a quick healthy snack and also for baking. But as you know, it seems like the window of opportunity for enjoying a banana at just the right ripeness is small, and then if my schedule doesn’t allow for baking, they can quickly get “too” ripe.

I know all about freezing bananas to keep them for baking, but sometimes my good intentions cause me to leave a couple out to the point where I question if they are still good.

One day I decided to check it out for myself, and I found this great tip:

Bananas that have a musty smell, fruit flies, mold on the stems or signs of rot and decay are no longer safe to eat. An overripe banana that looks and smells fine, on the other hand, doesn’t pose any health risks.

Furthermore, I have baked with such overripe bananas, and the results come out just fine.

4. The pandemic seems to be confirming that I am highly sensitive.

If I wasn’t quite convinced that I am a highly sensitive person before the pandemic, this crisis seems to be confirming that theory.

A highly sensitive person is someone who experiences acute physical, mental, or emotional responses to stimuli. (and if this makes no sense to you, that’s a good indication that you are not one). I’ve been learning more about this unique trait recently, but felt to do a little more specific research about how it affects us in our current reality.

This article pretty much sums up many of the ways the coronavirus pandemic has strongly affected me, and helped me to realize once again that we are all created uniquely and react differently.

And that’s a good thing.

5. Sometimes the burn signal on my Instant Pot can be safely ignored.

I love my Instant Pot, but my one nemesis is the dreaded “burn signal”.

While I am not a pressure cooker newbie, I haven’t been able to consistently avoid a burn signal, especially with certain types of dishes. But when I read this article that explains how the Instant Pot works and what it actually does when overheated, I now feel some relief. I now know that it is sometimes safe and effective to actually ignore the signal and let the pot try to complete its cooking program, and that the Instant Pot will actually try this five times before permanently shutting off.

Obviously we must use our own discretion while using a pressure cooker, but I’m thankful for all of the safety mechanisms built into this handy device.

6. Doing something “normal” is precious in times of crisis.

During times of difficulty, emotional upheaval, or high stress, our everyday, familiar tasks become precious.

Brewing a cup of coffee in the morning, spending some quiet time in prayer or reflection, working on a craft or project we enjoy, working in a garden or even sorting clothes and doing laundry are somehow comforting in a world of change, danger, and unknown.

7. Instacart is not cheap, but worth it right now.

During the current health crisis, I decided to avoid some of the risk (and unnecessary emotional stress) of grocery shopping and try Instacart. I quickly found it to be more expensive than I thought, but decided to pay for the Express membership for two or three months to help protect my husband with a heart condition and provide jobs for those who are willing to shop.

After a month, I cancelled my membership and thought I was ready to go back to shopping, but was also called back in to work at my library job. It is going alright, but is strange and difficult having to wear a mask and be so careful about everything we do or touch. In some ways it’s like learning a brand new job, and I found myself exhausted after each four hour shift.

So with the blessing of my husband, I decided to give Instacart another go. We agreed that my day off is much better spent at home at a time where my usual carefree shopping time is anything but.

I am also thankful to have a willing son who works at a grocery store, who volunteers to help out by picking up a few items each week as needed.

8. I may have a (Keds) sneaker fetish.

A couple of years ago I tried my first pair of Keds sneakers. I found them to be both comfortable and cute.

I discovered the joy of wearing them to some of my shifts at work, and learned that others even style them with dressier outfits. I also found that they make so many fun, pretty, and unique styles, so I guess I’m building up a small collection.

The dressy heel or fancy sandal that would bring joy to my young heart has been replaced by a more comfortable, “safe” shoe that’s still really pretty for this middle aged lady.

9. Everything is different in a pandemic.

We have come to be more used to this strange and scary world we’re living in in times of pandemic, yet it still overshadows almost everything we do. It’s hard to get away from it when there is literally nowhere to go.

At the beginning, I had fleeting fantasies of flying across the world to some remote place to flee from this scary situation, only to realize that it is indeed everywhere and there is almost literally no place to hide.

Not a day goes by that we aren’t hearing or talking about the Covid-19 pandemic, and even if I avoid too much news, I still feel it’s affects every single day.

We need to allow ourselves enjoyable activities and times of quiet that at least let our brains and emotions relax and get away from it all for a time.

10. Some things don’t change (even in a pandemic).

At the same time, some things will never change.

The sun still rises in the morning and sets every evening.

The seasons are coming and going and there is life in nature despite much sickness and death all around us.

I have a loving husband and family, a church who is like a second family (and successfully meeting online), creative outlets that refresh me, and fun and laughter that help me forget we’re in a crisis.

But most of all, I have a God who loves me, who is faithful to me in all of life’s seasons, and who is not surprised or intimidated by all of the things going on around us.

And for that I am truly thankful.


May sky with day moon

I’ve Got a Question

May sky with day moon

This post has been created for the Five-Minute Friday link-up, where the prompt for this week is question.

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Excuse me; I have a question.

Are you one who asks a lot of questions? I most definitely am.

It’s how I learn and process information. The more I understand something, the better I will remember it. It’s really helpful to me, but sometimes people don’t understand. Asking many questions can cause some to feel that you’re incompetent or that you don’t trust them, but I don’t think that’s farther from the truth.

When I was in seventh or eighth grade, I remember a particular time when after my asking a lot of questions in class some of my classmates taunted me with, “You ask too many questions.” Amazing how some things stick with us for decades.

There most definitely is a place for refusing to doubt, but I’m not entirely sure there’s really such a thing as “blind faith”. How else will our beliefs become truly our own if we haven’t worked through our doubts, questions and even some possible disagreements? How can we trust or follow something we truly haven’t worked to understand?

I am absolutely convinced that my husband is faithful to me, but that conviction is based upon first getting to know each other very well, our public commitment we made before God and many people when we married, and years of faithfulness to each other. I trust my belief in God in the same way. I’m not a Christian just because my parents are or because I was raised that way, but I’ve lived a lifetime of learning truths about God and his word and seeing it play out in countless lives, including my own.

So our “blind faith” is solidly built on facts and the truth of our own experience.

Rather than worry when our own children or someone we know questions God’s goodness or the truth of the Bible, we can be sure that they are at least thinking on their own. They must do the hard work of figuring out why it makes sense to believe. Real faith is not something we just accept or take for granted. Rather, a faith that’s survived questions, doubts and confusion is a firm foundation that will not be shaken.

So next time you have a question, go ahead and ask. Encourage others to do the same.

You will have more understanding and your convictions will become your own.

God can handle our doubts and our questions. Many great men and women of faith have asked their share of hard questions, and their stories live on over the ages to help and encourage people like us.

So please excuse me. I have a question.

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purple creeping phlox in my garden

What I Learned This Spring

purple creeping phlox in my garden

Another quarter has already passed, which surprisingly means another season has also almost flown by as well. It’s time to join my favorite link-up and share What I Learned This Spring. This is a collection of some of the interesting, helpful, and sometimes meaningful things I’ve learned in this season. I hope you enjoy learning a little, too.

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1.Can you really eat pineapple this way? –

Apparently, there is a really neat and easy way to eat a pineapple that went viral on the internet. This article describes the method shared by an actor from a well-known television show, and includes several videos of others’ attempts at using this same method. According to the results, it may not be as simple as it looks, although some people seemed to get it to work.

Truthfully, I haven’t tried this yet myself yet. I don’t have high hopes, but will certainly put fresh pineapple on my next grocery list.

2. I learned how to best store (dried) bay leaves, and that they do indeed have an aroma. –

I finally got to the end of a very old supply of bay leaves. I don’t even remember where or when I got them, but there’s a good chance they had become flavorless, since they had no scent. For this reason, I had developed the habit of using at least twice as many as my recipes called for. So I wasn’t very disappointed when I got to the end of the bottle and had to begin my search on Amazon for some new leaves.

After perusing many options, I settled on a one-pound package of bay leaves with good reviews and pressed the button to complete my purchase.

When I received and opened the very large bag, I was struck by two things. One, bay leaves actually have a smell and they are wonderfully fragrant (no more needing to double or triple up in recipes!), and two, bay leaves are very lightweight (one pound is a LOT of leaves, and looked like a small pillow!).

This led me to two next-steps: finding out how best to store my new culinary treasure, and attempting to share bay leaves with as many friends as possible. I discovered that the best way to store bay leaves is not in your spice cabinet, but rather in the freezer.

I guess my friends and I will be all set for awhile now.

3.There may be a better way to wash your produce. –

We’ve known the importance of washing our produce for awhile now, but according to recent studies, baking soda may be the best way to remove more pesticides from our fruit. A Consumer Reports article states that it is important to scrub the skins of produce and possibly even better to soak it in a solution of one teaspoon baking soda in two cups of water for at least two minutes. The longer the soak, the more pesticides are removed.

I also have a little paper towel trick I use to keep washed lettuce fresh longer.

I like to wash many of my vegetables by first spritzing with my DIY water-vinegar cleaning spray, then scrubbing with a veggie brush and rinsing well. I also try to check produce labels for where they are grown, as certain produce is known to be safer (less pesticides) from some countries than others.

In the end, I believe each of us needs to do our “due diligence” in research and then make decisions about what types of fruits and veggies to buy for our families and be at peace with that.

4. Doing without makes you appreciate something new all the more. –

I recently got new silverware.

My old silverware, which was supposed to be “stainless” steel, started to develop a nasty, blackish tarnish too soon after we purchased it several years ago. We used it as it was, thought about diligently polishing it for hours to try to remove the dark stains, but finally just gave up recently and decided we had put up with it long enough and would replace it.

I shopped around a bit, but didn’t take long to choose a few boxes of some quality pieces at one of my favorite warehouse stores.

I brought them home, washed them and began to replace my old silverware with the new and was quite pleased. For days (or perhaps even a couple of weeks), I realized how ridiculously happy I felt looking at and using our heavy, new, shiny forks, knives, and spoons. I actually said I felt like royalty, all because of a silly thing like brand new silverware.

The moral of the story, which I’ve learned over the years in many instances of either hardship or simply just putting up with something inferior, is that when you do without, it teaches you to really appreciate getting something new. It’s valuable to use what you have and choose gratitude in all circumstances, but also enjoyable to be able to splurge and appreciate a new purchase or gift that you’ve waited for patiently and with anticipation.

5.We’re learning about identifying ducks. –

While on a recent picnic, my husband and I were enjoying a flock of mallard ducks hanging out on a small river. We noticed one particular duck that looked similar, but not quite the same as the other mallards. He looked very dark, maybe all black, contrasted with the telltale dark green head of a common male mallard duck.

I’m still not sure, but I think he may have been an American Black Duck. Interestingly, I didn’t realize that the familiar mallard didn’t always breed in our area (Northeastern United States), but have grown to outnumber the native Black Ducks and thrive, while the Black Duck population is declining.

6.Organizing and decluttering really does save time. –

If there’s one thing that causes me more stress and discontent, it’s clutter and disorganization.

One would think that because I feel so strongly about this, and my personality craves order, that I would have the most orderly, clutter-free home around. But unfortunately, like every personality trait, there is a dark side that comes with each positive quality. I am easily overwhelmed and get bogged down in the details, often resulting in more clutter and less organization overall. I am gradually getting rid of stuff and organizing what’s left, and finding more and more how true it is that you can’t organize clutter.

According to this helpful article (the last frame), “It’s continuous maintenance. For every hour we spend organizing we save 3-4 hours”. Boy, do I believe it! The best advice seems to be to keep at it consistently, even just a few minutes at a time, to keep clutter at bay and continue to move forward with organization.

As I learn and try some of the popular Kon Mari method of tidying, I’m starting to really like the file folding method. Abby at Just a Girl and Her Blog has a great post detailing her take on this practical method.

7. I really like cold-brewed iced coffee the best!

For several years I’ve been tasting and making cold-brewed iced coffee. I first stumbled upon this method of brewing when I was looking for ways to enjoy coffee with less acid, due to some health concerns. I discovered that I also prefer the smooth taste of this type of brew.

Honestly, since switching our coffee maker to a nice system that allows one to make iced coffee immediately about a year ago, I’ve gotten away from making cold brew. Although we love this convenient feature on our coffee maker, I had forgotten just how good cold-brewed coffee tastes.

So I’m getting back to keeping some delicious, lower acid, cold-brewed iced coffee on hand this summer. Some things are really worth a little extra effort!

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Thanks for joining me again in reflecting on some of the things I’ve learned this spring. What are you learning lately? Do you take time to record and/or reflect on a season?

rain droplets on red and green bush leaves

Life is an Opportunity

rain droplets on red and green bush leaves

I’m (finally) joining in again to catch this week’s Five Minute Friday link-up, where the word for this week was opportunity.

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I’ve been thinking a lot about life lately.

Through my husband’s heart bypass surgery experience about a year and a half ago, the death of both of his sisters in the same twelve-month period shortly after that, the passing of my last grandmother at 101 years of age, to the recent news that my mother has cancer again, it makes me realize how fleeting life is. We don’t know whether we have five years, or forty-five or one hundred and five.

As hard as these experiences were and are, I know some of them turned out much better than we had hoped, and for that we are thankful. God met us and provided for us in our times of suffering and need, for which we are also grateful. And I’m confident that even through the difficult times, he is faithfully with us and will help us to grow stronger.

When faced with sickness, hardship and even death, it makes me realize once again the preciousness of life.

I see that each moment is a gift.

I recognize that things that seem ordinary are special.

I desire to complain less and praise and encourage more.

I’m learning that wherever I am, I want to be all there.

So wherever we find ourselves, whatever season we are journeying through, despite the hardships and joys and monotony, let’s grasp each moment as it comes and make the best of it.

Let’s enjoy each moment for what it is, rather than what we think it should be.

Let’s learn to just be present,

be real,

be content,

and love the days we’ve been given.

Let’s share each gift we’ve been given, make the most of each circumstance that comes our way, and savor each moment.

Because life truly is an opportunity.

Blue sky with clouds and snowy branches

What I Learned This Winter

Blue sky with clouds and snowy branches

It’s one of my favorite times again, where I join Emily P. Freeman’s link-up about what we learned this past season. What a wonderful habit of recording and reflecting on things I’ve learned, both silly and serious and somewhere in between.

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10 Things I Learned This Winter:

1. The “January blues” is a real thing. – I often struggle with the end of the holidays and the transition into the new year, but I guess there’s an official condition known as the “January blues”. It’s similar to, but not the same as Seasonal Affective Disorder. That means that many people struggle with this same thing. It’s OK to recognize if you also have a difficult time with this post-holiday time of year. That is how we start to find a way to make things better

2. I just had to know how to open a paper potato bag.– Have you ever wondered how to open those paper bags that are closed with a row of string stitched across the top? In the summer and fall I spend one day a week working at a farm stand at a local farm. One of the tricky little things I’ve run across is this type of closure on a huge fifty pound bag of potatoes. No one seems to know how to unravel the string, and it’s certainly not obvious.

So finally I decided one day this winter that there must be a way to open this type of sewn paper sack without going crazy or getting completely frustrated. I found several videos and written explanations online, but this one is one of the nicest and easiest to follow.

The solution seems simple enough, but the real test will be the next time I’m confronted by one of those bags. You’re welcome.

3. This February was the first time I had ever heard of “Galentine’s” Day. – This imaginary holiday has apparently been around for almost ten years, but I had never heard of it. If you’re out of the loop just like me, Galentine’s Day is a special day to celebrate our female friendships on February 13th, the day before Valentine’s Day. So if you’d like an excuse to shower your friends with appreciation and affection, by all means go for it. But if you are tired of trying to keep up with yet another “pretend” holiday, feel free to skip it, too.

Heart made of Lindor truffles.

4. I learned how to clear a drain naturally. – I’ve heard it said that you can clean almost anything with baking soda and/or vinegar. Well, recently I discovered that it just may be true.

We have a home with older pipes which seem to get clogged regularly. Over the years, we’ve had to spend money and dump too many gallons of toxic drain openers down our bathroom sinks, just to keep things running smoothly. One sink in particular was giving us a lot of trouble lately, so after several chemical treatments without luck, I decided to find out if there were any natural solutions.

One of the suggestions is to pour baking soda and then vinegar into the drain, followed by boiling water. (You can read about this idea here.) I tried it and was pleasantly surprised to see the water fizz and bubble and at least look like it was doing something. After a couple of tries, my husband came home and plunged the sink. This sink that had standing water in it for weeks was suddenly clear. I’d like to think it’s because of my natural remedy, but it could have been the plunging, or both. Only time will tell.

5. It’s possible that late people are more successful and live longer. – At least that’s what I read in an article in Southern Living. They suggest that those who are usually late are living more in the moment or are optimistically assuming that they can get more done in a certain time. I hate to disagree with the scientific evidence presented, but for me being late hasn’t seemed to be that beneficial. I’ve struggled with lateness over the years and worked hard to make improvements. The only thing I’ve felt in those times when I fall back into lateness is more stress and possibly embarrassment, as well as some degree of guilt or concern for those I’m causing to wait. I think I’ll take my chances and find success and fulfillment in other ways.

6. Pretzels were first brought to North America by the Pennsylvania Dutch. – While the earliest pretzels were made in Germany, years later in the 1700’s the Pennsylvania Dutch brought them to America. Pennsylvania is still first in production and consumption of pretzels in North America.

As a child, I had a best friend who came from Pennsylvania, and after several years in Canada living as my neighbor, their family moved back to that state. In subsequent years, my parents would drive me to Pennsylvania to spend a few days with my friend, while they enjoyed some vacation time in a nearby motel. I still remember visiting a local pretzel factory and have always thought that Pennsylvania makes some of the best pretzels. I think I was right.

7. I learned how simple it is to take a screen shot on my Android phone. – On my new phone, all I have to do is hold down the volume down and power buttons at the same time and the photo is saved to my gallery. Who knew? (Maybe you did, but it was news to me.)

8. I wasn’t using enough salt in my pasta cooking water. – According to Cooks Country magazine, their suggested ratio is 4 quarts of water to 1 tablespoon salt. And for all my years of cooking I’ve only added a sprinkle or at most maybe a teaspoon. Here’s to better pasta!

9.”I can care without carrying.” – In one of my recent quiet times, I was struck with how difficult it is as caring people to feel the burden of the needs and problems of those around us. As parents, we often feel the difficulties and fears of our children almost as strongly as they do themselves. Empathy and compassion are useful at times and can help others know they are cared for and not alone, but we cannot live in a state of constantly carrying everyone’s burdens as well as our own.

As I was thinking and praying about this, this phrase came into my mind: “I can care without carrying.” I think this simple statement will help to remind me that there are ways to show care and help someone without picking up and adding their burdens to my own.

10. I need a little “winter” before I can fully enjoy spring. – This has been an interesting winter. While many parts of the country seemed to get doses of winter dumped on them, here in New England it there’s been very little snow. We had some really cold days, but many unseasonably mild days mixed in. What little snow we had either melted away the next day or turned to rain and disappeared.

During one such storm in late January I turned on our Christmas lights, ran out of the house around midnight in my robe and slippers and snapped some pretty snow photos with my colored lights. By the next morning, it had turned to rain.

Christmas lights in fluffy, late January snow.
My Christmas lights in fluffy snowflakes around midnight.
Close-up of Christmas lights in late January snow.
Christmas lights in a pretty, late January snow.

We just had a couple of snow days this past week in March, and we had about fourteen inches of snow which is staying on the ground. As satisfying as it was to get a “real” snowstorm, I am now officially ready for spring.

view from window after snowstorm
The view from our bedroom window.
Our home in the snow.
Our home after the March 2019 snowstorm.

Thanks for joining me for another quarter of what I learned.

What have you been learning lately?

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God With Us

Today’s post is written for the link-up at Five Minute Friday, where the word of the week is with.

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“Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and bear a Son, and they shall call His name Immanuel,” which is translated, “God with us.”

Matthew 1:23 New King James Version (NKJV)

 

 

In that simple phrase, “God with us”, can be found the entire message of not only Christmas, but the whole Bible.

The Christmas story is unique in that the God of the universe chose to take on frail human flesh to live a life of love to reach us.

He did not sit on a throne of judgement, counting all of our short-comings against us; he doesn’t require us to reach a certain standard before he will accept or love us.

He came to us as a helpless infant, grew up in our skin, and showed us the way to live to find true life.

He made himself the solution to our need.

He came to us.

God with us.

Whatever you are facing this Christmas, take time to be still and reflect on what Christmas means to you.

Have peace knowing that someone cares for you enough that he came to you. You can trust him with your hopes, fears, joy and pain.

Perhaps the story is best told by a simple and familiar young voice:

 

 

For unto us a Child is born,
Unto us a Son is given;
And the government will be upon His shoulder.
And His name will be called
Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Isaiah 9:6 New King James Version (NKJV)

 

 

Love has come. Peace is here.

God with us. 

Merry Christmas.

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wheat grass, cat grass, kitties

The Things We Want to Share

wheat grass, cat grass, kitties

Today I’m joining in with the bunch at Five Minute Friday, where the prompt of the day is share.

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Since we were little we learned that it is good to share.

As a mom of two sons and eventually a teacher’s aide, I often taught the art of sharing.

 

But as an adult, I now realize that there are some things that we do not want to share.

Nasty cold germs.

Financial problems due to poor decisions or lack of self-control.

A life’s worth of clutter for others to clean up after I die.

Days filled with too much complaining.

Constant words of criticism.

 

These are just a few of the things we should keep to ourselves (or in many cases, get help or change!).

 

But there are many positive things we want to share with those we find around us.

A smile.

A cheery or encouraging word.

A message of hope.

Special and thoughtful gifts (big or small).

Sincere empathy, thoughts and prayers.

A helping hand.

Even a loving but gentle rebuke (spoken in love to someone to which we have become close and earned the right).

Good advice.

A listening ear or a shoulder to cry on.

 

It may cost us something, but often it doesn’t have to.

But we will gain far more than we give.

So let’s share the good things.

Let’s bless another, and in turn, be blessed.

These are the things we want to share.

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Do you have any suggestions to add to my list? This is just a start.

I’d love to hear your thoughts!

 

 

 

 

 

blueberry avocado muffins thriving home

Thirteen: Unlucky Number or Baker’s Dozen?

blueberry avocado muffins thriving home

Today’s post contains my thoughts about the Five Minute Friday link-up prompt, thirteen.

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The number thirteen conveys so many different things.

The first aspect of thirteen is that it is the “unlucky” number. People feel so strongly about this that it has created many superstitions, even causing many tall buildings to not even have a thirteenth floor.

Although I don’t consider myself to be superstitious, I often naturally tend to see things in a negative light.

But thirteen has a better meaning; one on which I’d much rather place my focus.

The baker’s dozen.

What can be better than going to purchase your favorite home-baked donuts or fresh bagels and being offered a thirteenth, free baked good?

Instead of focusing on something negative or bad, I’d rather focus on the good, and even special things in life.

I need to remind myself daily to choose gratitude and to see things from a larger perspective, rather than dwell on what seems negative or difficult in the moment.

Besides, even difficulties can cause us to grow if we allow them, and I believe there can be purpose even in our pain.

It’s a matter of perspective.

So next time I see the number thirteen, rather than going down the path of negativity, I choose to focus on the good; the free gifts that life has to offer me.

It may not be easy or come naturally, but we can choose gratitude and a positive perspective.

This is the life I wish to cultivate.

Won’t you join me?

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May sky with day moon

Choose Your What Ifs

May sky with day moon

For today’s post, I’m linking up with the gang of writers at Five Minute Friday, where our prompt of the week is if.

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It’s easy in life to think of all of the what-ifs, and come up feeling mostly regret.

What if I had made different decisions, or done things differently? What if I had performed better, or refrained from certain actions? What if life had been easier, gone more smoothly, and things had been different? What if I had a better job, made more money, or had my dream home?

What if my life had gone according to my plan?

The fact is, we all have some regrets. A few are perhaps legitimate, in which case we need to seek and receive forgiveness and do something to make things right, or extend forgiveness to someone who has truly wronged us. In the end, we must let them go.

But our what-ifs are a choice.

What if I began each day with quiet and focus, giving it to God and waiting to hear and receive the direction, strength and wisdom I need.

What if I looked for the good in each person and situation, and trusted that good can come even out of the bad or difficult?

What if I allowed myself and others grace and used my gifts and resources for positive changes in my life and the lives of those around me?

What if I accepted each moment as a gift, rather than dwell on the past or reach too hard for the future?

What if I slowed down to enjoy my precious life and actually stopped to smell the flowers?

purple creeping phlox in my garden

What if I practiced choosing gratitude and learned to let more things go?

I believe we do have choices.

And I pray that I can live my life with my eyes looking up and my heart open to give and receive the good gifts all around me.

What if

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